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4 edition of Soil and hydrologic factors affecting the stability of natural slopes in the Oregon Coast Range found in the catalog.

Soil and hydrologic factors affecting the stability of natural slopes in the Oregon Coast Range

R. Dennis Harr

Soil and hydrologic factors affecting the stability of natural slopes in the Oregon Coast Range

project completion report

by R. Dennis Harr

  • 273 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Water Resources Research Institute, Oregon State University in Corvallis, Ore .
Written in

    Places:
  • Oregon,
  • Coast Range.
    • Subjects:
    • Slopes (Physical geography) -- Oregon -- Coast Range,
    • Soils -- Oregon -- Coast Range,
    • Hydrology -- Oregon -- Coast Range

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby R. Dennis Harr and Carlton S. Yee ; submitted to Office of Water Research and Technology, U.S. Department of the Interior.
      ContributionsYee, Carlton S., joint author., United States. Office of Water Research and Technology., Oregon State University. Water Resources Research Institute.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsGB448 .H37
      The Physical Object
      Pagination204 p. :
      Number of Pages204
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL4071022M
      LC Control Number79625125

        Subsurface stormflow is a runoff producing mechanism operating in most upland terrains. In a humid environment and steep terrain with conductive soils, subsurface stormflow may be the main mechanism of storm runoff generation. property, do occur. The majority of these slope failures are of vegetated or forested natural slopes. A natural slope is different from an embankment or a man-made slope in that the effects of vegetation and soil variability play an important role in their stability. The effects of vegetation on the stability of slopes are well by:

        Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. Author of Effect of wetting mode on shear strength of two aggregated soils, Soil and hydrologic factors affecting stability of natural slopes . Slope stability refers to the condition of inclined soil or rock slopes to withstand or undergo stability condition of slopes is a subject of study and research in soil mechanics, geotechnical engineering and engineering geology. Slope stability analyses include static and dynamic, analytical or empirical methods to evaluate the stability of earth and rock-fill dams, .

      Combined/Hydrology And Slope Stability (CHASM). An infinite limit equilibrium stability model that includes the effects of soil suction is developed for this purpose. The hydrologic model predicts the water conditions above and below the phreatic surface while the incorporation of soil suction more accurately predicts the shear strength of the.   Prior work focused on hydrologic response and slope stability in the Oregon Coast Range noted minor errors as a result of neglecting evapotranspiration in hydrologic-response numerical simulation, with evapotranspiration amounting to 1 to 3% of the annual water balance during the wetter portion of the year, October through May, when slope Cited by: 2.


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Soil and hydrologic factors affecting the stability of natural slopes in the Oregon Coast Range by R. Dennis Harr Download PDF EPUB FB2

This study was conducted to examine certain soil and hydrologic properties of two major cohesionless soils Occupying 55% of the central portion of the Oregon Coast Range.

Knowledge of these properties was desired to determine the role each played in the stability of slopes in this by: Soil and hydrologic factors affecting the stability of natural slopes in the Oregon Coast Range Public DepositedCited by: Soil and hydrologic factors affecting stability of natural slopes in the Oregon Coast Range.

Abstract. Graduation date: This study was conducted to examine certain soil and hydrologic\ud properties of two major cohesionless soils Occupying 55% of the central\ud portion of the Oregon Coast Range.

Knowledge of these properties was\ud. Soil and hydrologic factors affecting the stability of natural slopes in the Oregon Coast Range. Pacific Northwest Forest and Range Experiment Station Corvallis: Oregon State University, Water Resources Research Institute.

Year: OAI identifier. Soil and hydrologic factors affecting the stability of natural slopes in the Oregon Coast Range.

Two major cohesionless soil series of the central Coast Ranges of Oregon were examined for soil and hydrologic properties. Although derived from different Aggregation in both soils was found to be the most important property, for it influences shear strength and subsurface water movement, prime components of slope by: Simulated effect of topography and soil properties on hydrologic response and landslide potential under variable rainfall conditions in the Oregon Coast Range, USA Chapter (PDF Available) June.

slope, rock, soil, and drainage characteristics and geologic processes. These analyses are often completed using slope stability charts and the DSARA (Deterministic Stability Analysis for Road Access) slope stability program. The probabalistic SARA (Stability Analysis for Road Access) program is still under development.

A slope is a ground surface that inclines either may be natural or man-made. Each slope has its own soil characteristics and geometric features, in order to resist gravity or collapse. Soil mass will move slowly or suddenly without any signage downward and outward when slope failure occurred.

where S n is called the stability number, defined by Eq. () for an infinite cohesive soil slope. Factor of Safety for a Submerged Cohesive Soil Slope: Factor of safety against shear failure for a submerged slope is given by – The critical height for submerged cohesive soil slope is given by – 3.

Factor of Safety for a Cohesive Soil. Soil Organic Matter. Soil organic matter is arguably the most important soil component, influencing soil structure, water-holding capacity, soil stability, nutrient storage and turnover, and oxygen-holding capacity, properties that are fundamental in maintaining and improving soil quality.

The slope angle The angle of internal friction of the soil The soil void ratio Any additional load on the soil surface q combined with the dynamic hydrologic conditions that are characterized by the saturated thickness of the soil above the failure plane h, and The unsaturated zone soil moisture Sw Gray, D.H.

Effects of forest clearcutting on the stability of natural slopes. Dept. of Civil Engineering, National Science Foundation, Grant No. GK Forest cover appears to affect the deep seated stability of soils in two principal ways (viz.

by modifying the hydrologic regime in the soil mantle and by mechanical reinforcementFile Size: 92KB. This investigation employs 3D, variably saturated subsurface flow simulation to examine hysteretic effects upon the hydrologic response used to drive unsaturated slope stability assessments at the Coos Bay 1 (CB1) experimental catchment in the Oregon Coast Range, USA.

Slope stability is evaluated using the relatively simple infinite slope model for Cited by: The stability of a slope is evaluated through the safety factor (F s), by also taking into account the partial saturation contribution to the soil shear strength, in terms of the apparent soil cohesion, for soil under partially saturated by: Soil Bioengineering for Slope Stability Introduction Soil bioengineering can be an effective means of treating eroding surfaces and unstable surficial soil layers in the forest environment.

Soil bioengineering is a term that describes the use of living plant materials to build structures that provide slope support. A knowledge of slope. stability of a slope may be assessed using a limit-equilibrium analysis, with appropriate drainage conditions and shear strengths.

This chapter provides a basic outline of slope stability analysis. For detailed design guidance and reference, geotechnical designers are directed to FHWA/NHI Soil Slope and Embankment Design. [1] Scale and slope dependence of hydrologic response are investigated for two channel network source areas (unchanneled valleys) in the Oregon Coast Range.

Observations of response to both natural and applied precipitation reveal that runoff occurred as subsurface flow in which water passed through partially saturated soil, into the shallow fractured bedrock Cited by: The definitive guide to the critical issue of slope stability and safety. Soil Strength and Slope Stability, Second Edition presents the latest thinking and techniques in the assessment of natural and man-made slopes, and the factors that cause them to survive or crumble.

Using clear, concise language and practical examples, the book explains the practical aspects of. sliding surface in the slopes. Keywords: Slope stability, Water level, Sliding surface, Safety factor INTRODUCTION The rock slope stability is one of the most important problems in large construction projects and factors that cause instability of slopes lead to rock fall, soil and debris and finally destroying the balance of mass in slope.

Rainfall, hydrological condition, and geological formation of slope are important contributing factors to slope failures. Parametric studies were carried out to study the effect of groundwater table position, rainfall intensities, and soil properties in affecting slope stability.Portions of the Oregon Coast Range are highly dissected with narrow ridgetops, steep slopes (32–47°), and local re - lief typically less than m (Fig.

1).About this book Published by the American Geophysical Union as part of the Water Resources Monograph Series, Volume This monograph compiles research findings on soil mass movement into a format usable by practitioners and students.